Caritas Czech Republic launches a fundraising appeal to aid the tsunami victims in Indonesia

Caritas For Indonesia

On Friday, 28 September the Indonesian island of Sulawesi (or Celebes) has suffered the most intensive of earthquakes so far, with a force of 7.4 on the Richter scale. The subsequent tsunami wave has taken the toll of hundreds of human lives; the total number of affected people could reach several hundreds of thousands, according to some estimates even two million. Caritas Czech Republic has therefore launched a fundraising appeal to support the victims of the tsunami as well as the restoration of the country.

South Sudan – the worst hunger and violence of the last 15 years

Looking for food in a bush (photo: Caritas Internationalis).

“My body was shaking from hunger,” said Julia Kefi, a 65 year old widow living in Rajaf, a rural village in South Sudan. “So I set off at 7 am to find wild vegetables and am returning now at midday. Food in the bush is becoming scarce. Once that’s finished, we will wait for death.” Sometimes Julia is too weak to make the arduous trip into the bush. “We share so that everyone makes it to the end of the day,” she said. Read more on a new webiste of Caritas Internationalis dedicated to South Sudan (HERE).

"All my memories about Raqqa are wonderful," said Rabba Lissa

Rabba Lissa is strong woman (photo: Patrick Nicholson/Caritas).

"Life in Raqqa used to be good We had sheep, some land, water. When the problems with ISIS started there, we left for Damascus. We managed to get out before they cut the roads. All my memories about Raqqa are wonderful. ISIS are not good. They stole our land, they killed people. By the time we’d left, there were no jobs left. People were very afraid. We sold our properties and left. Now the house and the farm land have been completely destroyed by the bombing," said Rabba Lissa (60). Read more HERE.

Cardinal Tagle suggests “meet a migrant” and spread the Easter spirit

Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle with his grandparents.

"My family began with the migration of a child. My maternal grandfather was born in China. His mother was very poor so she sent her son with a relative who travelled to the Philippines – and that’s where I was born and grew up," said Cardinal Antonio Tagle. Read all his Easter message on a caritas.org.

Abeer Al Hasan still believe in a future of Syria

Abeer Al Hasan (photo: Patrick Nicholson/Caritas Internationalis).

“We had to leave our home because of the fighting. My husband passed away seven months ago. He stepped on a landmine near his factory. When I got the call there had been an accident, I went straight away to the hospital. I didn’t see him as they’d already buried the body. I was in shock. I couldn’t stop crying," said Abeer Al Hasan, mother of two children. Read more HERE.

"We survived because we ran on time"

Badia and her only daughter (photo: Patrick Nicholson/CI).

“ISIS took control of my suburb in Aleppo, there was terrible suffering. ISIS men controlled everything to buy. It became very expensive. People were being killed in their homes in Aleppo. If a woman wore green or red, they would attack her. If she was beautiful, they would take her and rape her and use her as a slave. Our neighbour was taken, and when she didn’t come back the husband killed himself," said Badia Mehmid (35), mother of nine children. Read all story on a Patrick Nicholson´s photo gallery HERE.

Six years in Syria

Six years in Syria.

The war in Syria began on 15 March 2011. Six years later, the country has been left devastated. Caritas works both inside Syria, in neighbouring countries which host the bulk of the refugees and across Europe where hundreds of thousands have fled in search of safety.

Caritas Internationalis website: 6 years of war in Syria

War in Syria lasts 6 years (photo: Patrick Nicholson/Caritas).

The war in Syria began on 15 March 2011. Six years later, the country has been left devastated. “We appeal for peace,” said Caritas Syria President Bishop Antoine Audo of Aleppo. “We need peace and reconciliation. Peace is possible in Syria!” Caritas Internationalis published a new website dedicated to the crisis. See it HERE.

South Sudanese refugees in Uganda

272 000 inhabitants now live in the Bidi Bidi (photo: Tommy Trenchard).

Seven months ago, Bidi Bidi was a quiet village in the grasslands of northern Uganda. Now, with a population of over 272,000 for Bidi bidi alone, it is the second biggest refugee camp in the world. The refugees are fleeing war and famine in South Sudan.

South Sudan bishops: “This famine is man-made”

South Sudanese refugees recieves Caritas aid in Uganda (photo: Tommy Trenchard/Caritas).

Following the declaration of famine in Unity State, South Sudan this week, the country’s Catholic bishops have issued a powerful pastoral letter condemning the country’s civil war and labelling the famine as “man-made”. In a hard-hitting document responding to dire reports coming in from all seven dioceses in the country, the bishops denounce government and opposition violence being perpetrated against civilians: “The killing, torturing and raping of civilians is a war crime”.